15 August 2008

Learnings

Overview of the last two weeks of learning - focussed on Knowledge Management/Information Management/Open Source Software


Articles/slide shares

User Centred Design for Web 2.0 and Beyond

Cory Banks – Knowledge Manager PB discusses the KM issues at PB
My first six months

James Robertson – Step Two Design - Collaboration is about people (not the one he gave at the conference, but I like it better as it is more people focussed). When the one from the conference is available I will add it to this document.

James Robertson writes 2-3 whitepapers a month on KM – these can be found at
Step Two

Karen Huffman – National Geographic – What’s all the buzz about social networking applications?

A discussion on web 3.0

BTnet – this will give you free access to many journal articles – I just found one on the difference between IM and KM.

Michael Sampson – we’re catching up

Michael Sampson – 7 pillars – I thought this was a good simple approach to working with distributed teams. This can be used to assess whether a product is going to do what you need it to do.

Max Weakly – gave a paper at Open publish 08 which I did not attend, when I can find it on slide share I will post it here – Web designer for the Australian Museum. Max also gave us the following quote “every tag is sacred” with apologies to Monty Python

Matt Moore – The truth about enterprise 2.0

Cool and useful sites to look at

Slideshare
Here you can share your slides, or get inspiration from others slides.

Step Two Design

Mindmeister – an online mid mapping tool
a place many people can collaborate at the same time

Shared Spaces – Michael Sampson’s site – has interesting articles that would be worth RSSing.

Icerocket
searches blogs, web, myspace, news, images

Summise
aggregates twitter tweets

Friendster
a social network site like Myspace or Facebook

Eric Schmidt - Founder of Google
responsible for making AJAX popular

Twine : Twine is a new service that helps you organize, share and discover information about your interests, with networks of like-minded people. You can use Twine alone, with friends, groups and communities, or even in your company.

Cool Tools
AJAX
first coined in 1998, made popular in 2005 by Google.

An fun explanation of code design by a rapper on Youtube (for all the techies)
Art is immortal


Useful things that I learnt

1. If you want to collaborate or effect change then your group needs to feel at least one of the following things before they will collaborate effectively or make the cultural or corporate change that you are looking for.
R = Responsible
A = Accountable
C = Consulted
I = Informed

2. Wiki’s will move into virtual intranets
3. Move to 720 degree feedback particularly for web producers (blogs, intra/inter net, online publishers etc) – that is 360 degree feedback from your work colleagues and 360 degree feedback from your online clients
4. QR coding (also known as Telstra Codes)
A company embeds a code in a poster on the wall and you point your mobile phone at it, you connect to the internet and you can then purchase what is being advertised on the poster – tickets, clothes whatever.
Here is a demo from Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDop0sqOR2E&feature=email
5. Within 5 years the majority of web usage world wide will be mobile – my interpretation of something Matt Moore talked of.
6. Information placed on the web will need to be device agnostic

Cool and Useful Blogs to watch

Technorati
This is a good place to start looking at what blogs are out there as it covers multitudes of blogs and enables the viewer to see what is happing in blog world.

Steve Rubel’s twitter site

Steve Rubel’s combined site – combines blog, twiter, flikr and friendfeed

Matt Moore - Engineers without fears blog. If you get a chance to hear this chap speak take it – he is excellent.

Beware there is more, only my brain hurts now...must lie down...arghhhh

1 comment:

msampsonmnet said...

Thanks for the link ... the best current one for me is http://www.michaelsampson.net ... Shared Spaces is an old work of mine.

Take care,
M.